Which Sharks Attack The Most? 10 Shark Species Responsible For The Most...

Which Sharks Attack The Most? 10 Shark Species Responsible For The Most Attacks On Humans!

10 Shark Species Responsible For The Most Attacks On Humans!

Great_White_Shark
Great White Shark by Elias Levy cc2.0

We know for a fact that sharks attack humans. Why? There are several theories. Some say it’s because the shark is hungry and the human happened to be an easy meal. Some blame curiosity. Others say it was just a mistake. Sure, a shark can’t commit the same mistake a lot of times but whoever said it was the same shark behind all the attacks?

There’s need to panic, though, since the chances of being attacked by a shark are less than the chances of being struck by lightning, bitten by a doing or falling down the stairs. Besides, out of the more than 400 species of sharks worldwide, less than 50 have been known to attack humans.

Which sharks attack the most? Let’s take a look.


10. Oceanic Whitetip Shark

Oceanic_Whitetip_Shark
Oceanic whitetip shark by OldakQuill GFDL

Confirmed Attacks: 10 (3 fatal).

Where it lives – Tropical waters all over the world, particularly in deep waters.

What it looks like – The oceanic whitetip shark has a stout body and a rounded dorsal fin. All of its fin have white tips and sometimes, it might have white markings on its body, as well. Sometimes, its underside can be yellowish. Its teeth are triangular shaped and are only jagged near the tip.

Oceanic whitetip sharks often swim with remoras, dolphins and pilot whales.

Why it’s dangerous – Some people consider the oceanic whitetip shark to be the shark who has consumed the most humans. That’s because they are always the first at the scene of shipwrecks or crashed planes. When there is a lot of blood in the water, the shark goes into a feeding frenzy. It is also unpredictable around divers.

What it usually eats – Fish, sea turtles, sea birds, squids, crustaceans, dead whales and sometimes, human garbage.




9. Blue shark

Prionace_glauca
Blue shark (Prionace glauca) off southern California. Image credit: Mark Conlin/NMFS

Confirmed attacks: 13 (4 fatal).

Where it lives – All over the world, except in polar waters.

What it looks like – The blue shark is considered one of the most beautiful sharks, bluish on top and white at the bottom. It has a slender body, a long snout and large eyes. Its teeth are overlapping and triangular, with the top ones more curved than the bottom ones.

Why it’s dangerous – Blue sharks are the most widely distributed sharks in the world and can often be found in groups. They are curious and tend to encircle swimmers or divers before giving an exploratory bite.

What it usually eats – Fish, squid, octopus and cuttlefish.


8. Bronze Whaler or Copper Shark

Bronze_whaler
Bronze whaler (Carcharhinus brachyurus) by Robert Nyman cc2.0

Confirmed Attacks: 15 (1 fatal).

Where it lives – All over the world in temperate waters, particularly the Mediterranean Sea, Gulf of Mexico and East China Sea.

What it looks like – The bronze whaler has a streamlined body with a long, pointed snout and large, round eyes. It is olive grey on the top and white at the bottom. Its upper teeth are distinctively hook-shaped.

Why it’s dangerous – The bronze whaler can grow over 9 feet long. Most of its attacks have been recorded from Australia and New Zealand, where it is common. Even so, it is believed to be a generally docile shark.

What it usually eats – Squid, cuttlefish, octopus, fish, jellyfish and prawns.


7. Hammerhead Sharks

Great_hammerhead_shark
Great hammerhead by Albert kok cc4.0

Confirmed Attacks: 17 (0 fatal).

Where they live – All over the world, in both shallow and deep waters.

What they look like – Distinctively, hammerhead sharks have horizontally long and flattened heads with eyes at the tips, which is how they got their name. Some hammerhead sharks have heads that look more like shovel heads, though, with curved edges.

Why they’re dangerous – The great hammerhead shark is one of the largest sharks which can grow up to 20 feet long. Aside from the great hammerhead shark, only two other species of hammerhead sharks have attacked humans – the scalloped hammerhead shark, which is the most widely distributed of the hammerhead sharks and the smooth hammerhead shark, which can grow up to 16 feet long. Most hammerhead sharks stay in groups during the day.

What they usually eat – Fish (especially stingrays), crabs, squid and octopus.


6. Sand Tiger Shark

Sand_Tiger_Shark
Sand Tiger Shark by asw909 cc2.0

Confirmed Attacks: 29 (0 fatal).

Where it lives – Around the world in both cool and warm waters, especially in coral reefs and sandy shorelines.

What it looks like – The sand tiger shark looks the most menacing of all the sharks. It has a bulky body and its dagger-like teeth show through its mouth even when it’s closed. It has a long, pointed snout and small eyes.

Why it’s dangerous – The sand tiger shark is generally docile but can become aggressive when approached too closely or surrounded by divers. It is a large shark that can grow over ten feet long and its sharp teeth can do a lot of damage.

What it usually eats – Fish, squid, crabs and lobsters.


5. Blacktip Shark

Carcharhinus_limbatus_Blacktip_Shark
Blacktip shark by Albert Kok PD Image

Confirmed Attacks: 29 (1 fatal).

Where it lives – All around the world especially in the Gulf of Mexico, the Caribbean Sea and around islands in the Pacific.

What it looks like – The blacktip shark has a stout body, a long, pointed snout and black tips on its fins. Its teeth are small but sharp.

Why it’s dangerous – The blacktip shark can grow up to 9 feet long and is known for energetically leaping out of the water. When there is plenty of food around, it goes into a frenzy so staying away from schools of fish is advisable.

What it usually eats – Fish, crustaceans and squid.


4. Wobbegong Sharks

wobbegong sharks facts
Image credit: Charles Barilleaux (MrGuilt) cc2.0

Confirmed Attacks: 32 (0 fatal).

Where they live – Around Australia, Indonesia and Japan in shallow waters and reefs.

What they look like – There are 12 species of wobbegong sharks which are also called carpet sharks because they have flattened bodies with bright patterns that blend in well with the bottom of the ocean. They also have barbels which look like whiskers sticking out of their snouts, as well as lobes of excess skin.

Why they’re dangerous – Wobbegong sharks are sluggish sharks which rest along the bottom of the ocean during the day. Because they like to linger in shallow waters and are so well camouflaged, swimmers easily step on them, which often results in the wobbegong shark biting. Wobbegong sharks have sharp teeth that can pierce through diving suits. They also have powerful jaws and are unlikely to let go once they bite someone.

What they usually eat – Fish, crabs, lobsters and octopus.


3. Bull Shark

Bullshark
Bull shark. PD image

Confirmed Attacks: 100 (21 fatal).

Where it lives – All over the world in coastal waters, rivers and lakes
What it looks like – The bull shark has a stout body and a round snout with small eyes. It is pale to dark grey on top and white at the bottom. Its teeth are triangular like the great white shark’s.

Why it’s dangerous – Bull sharks like to swim in shallow waters and even freshwater, which makes it common for them to come in contact with humans. They are large, the largest ones growing over 11 feet long and have a bad temper. Some scientists consider them to be the most dangerous sharks in the world.

What it usually eats – Fish, dolphins, sea turtles, sea birds, squid, crabs and shrimp.


2. Tiger Shark

Tiger_shark
Tiger shark bahamas. Image credit: Albert kok GFDL v1.2

Confirmed Attacks: 111 (31 fatal).

Where it lives – All over the world, except in the Mediterranean Sea and polar waters, preferably near the coastline.

What it looks like – The tiger shark is brownish or bluish grey on top with spots and stripes that fade as it gets older and white on the bottom. It has a large head with large eyes and a ridge behind its dorsal fin. Its teeth are notched with saw-like edges.

Why it’s dangerous – The tiger shark is a large shark that can grow over 14 feet long. It has a large appetite and will eat just about anything, unfortunately even humans.

What it usually eats – Fish, dolphins, sea turtles, sea otters, squid, crustaceans, sea birds, dead whales, even human garbage.




1. Great White Shark

Great_White_Shark
Great White Shark by Elias Levy cc2.0

Confirmed Attacks: 314 (80 fatal).

Where it lives – All over the world in both deep and shallow waters, except near the poles.

What it looks like – The great white shark is grayish blue on top and white at the bottom with a torpedo-shaped body, a round snout and a large fin on its back. Its teeth are triangular shaped with saw-like edges.

Why it’s dangerous – Great white sharks are the largest predatory fish, believed to grow over 22 feet long. They are excellent hunters, able to see well in the dark and smell a drop of blood up to three miles away. They have rows of teeth up to three inches long so even if they just get a bite out of you, which they like to do in order to investigate, you might lose a limb and a lot of blood.

What it usually eats – Seals, sea lions, dolphins, fishes (including smaller sharks and rays) and sea turtles.


awesome shark


25 Sharks Responsible For The Most Human Attacks


Sources:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shark_attack
http://www.sharkattackfile.net/species.htm
http://www.flmnh.ufl.edu/fish/sharks/statistics/species3.htm
http://www.flmnh.ufl.edu/fish/gallery/descript/whiteshark/whiteshark.html

To view the complete list of sources, click here…

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